Word tricks: adding line numbers to an extract

I love Word sometimes. Its headers, tables of contents, and line numbering features save loads of time – when you’re writing example papers, or booklets, they’re so helpful! I mentioned this on Twitter (ages ago admittedly) and a few people asked about it, so here’s how to do it: The screenshots are Word 2016 – if you have an older version it’s still under Page Layout in a similar way   Paste the extract into the document. Choose the font and size – it’s easiest to do this at the beginning. I usually just highlight it all and click “Normal” …

Towards a model of well-being in the English department

In September I take a step up to lead the department in which I’ve been second for two years. From personal experience and looking at the year ahead, one of my major areas of focus will be staff well-being. We have increased responsibilities, shrinking budgets, higher expectations and a highly pressurised timetable which includes a lot less planning time. It’s essential to take what steps we can to make the department an enjoyable place to work. Schools aren’t (take a deep breath!) only for the students. Happy, balanced and enjoyable work lives enable staff to do better jobs, no matter …

Women through the ages – a new scheme of work

Like many teachers I’m currently in the middle of planning for next year, with a bit more space to rethink the curriculum, and a comment from one of my Year 13 students has stayed with me. I think I’d written some feedback about avoiding generalisation regarding the representation of women  not treating Renaissance and Victorian women the same in her context-heavy essay – and she said that she didn’t really know the difference. She knew there was one, that women’ rights couldn’t have been completely stagnant until the early twentieth century, but didn’t have a strong grasp of what the …

Planning comparison essays for GCSE and A Level

One of the most difficult skills to do well is, I think, comparison, and it’s often what distinguishes really good writers – the ability to hold both texts together and weigh them against one another. This post explores some ways to plan a comparative answer – before you’re in the exam hall! I actually think the A-Level style of questions works better to prompt good, focused comparison – so let’s compare the two: GCSE: Explore the way Browning presents painful relationships in ‘Porphyria’s Lover’ and one other poem from the Relationships cluster. A-Level: Dystopian writing often portrays a bleak future …